Real Steel

November 1, 2011 by

[gameinfo title=”Game Info” game_name=”” developers=”YUKE’S” publishers=”YUKE’S” platforms=”” genres=”” release_date=”December 14, 2011″] Developed and published by YUKE’S, Real Steel is a ten dollar downloadable movie tie-in game released on XBLA and PSN. The movie is essentially a sports movie about robot boxing in the near fictional future. Real Steel the game is a recipe for disaster. …

[gameinfo title=”Game Info” game_name=”” developers=”YUKE’S” publishers=”YUKE’S” platforms=”” genres=”” release_date=”December 14, 2011″]

Developed and published by YUKE’S, Real Steel is a ten dollar downloadable movie tie-in game released on XBLA and PSN. The movie is essentially a sports movie about robot boxing in the near fictional future. Real Steel the game is a recipe for disaster. It is a boxing game based on a bad movie about Rock Em Sock Em Robot Pro Boxing. So the question is does the game step out of the shadows of the piles of bad movie licensed games that came beforehand or does it just add to the shameful pile of rubbish?

Going in with low expectations, the game starts off with the customizing of a robot boxer. Unfortunately there are very few choices initially to customizing the robot. A new player is going to want to beef up their robots in single player before attempting any kind of multiplayer so that leaves one option, grinding experience and cash against progressively more difficult robots.

There are 20 different AI robots split over 5 “stages” that are essentially progression ladders. Unfortunately since there are so few opponents and that the player’s progression is so slow, time has to be spent grinding out on robots previously beaten. Experience is gained from doing different techniques while fighting. If you block and dodge, guard and speed experience is gained. Punch someone silly and offensive experience is given until a knockdown in which performance experience is given. Eventually a level in a stat is gained and the robot performs a smidgen better.

The real way to improve your robot is to earn money and buy new custom parts. This is where the game gets kind of shady. The rate of parts unlocked and cash to buy parts is low. While navigating the store to buy the parts, one might notice that there is a secondary DLC store where full robot sets can be bought for 10 dollars or individual parts for 2 dollars a piece. This secondary store can be completely ignored but it will take quite a bit of playing to get anywhere near the quality of items for sale for cash. It almost seems as though the game was designed so people would buy DLC parts to progress.

Now that the bad of the game has been discussed, Real Steel does have some redeeming quality. The actual gameplay of the game can be fun. Left and right head/body punches with block, dodge, and special move modifier. It is very similar to the early Fight Night games. It is just a shame that good gameplay is ruined by poor customization and shady DLC.

Score: 4/10

The game is fun to play for all of 15 minutes until forced into the grind for progression (or opening your wallet).

About Brandon Koch

I write stuff. I play stuff. I code stuff.