Satirical Mod Adds Loot Boxes To Doom

Nov 25, 2017 by

24 years after the initial release of the ground-breaking Doom, modder Rip and Tear has finally brought the game into the modern generation with everyone’s favourite optional RNG-based system: loot boxes.

Released onto popular Doom modding forum ZDoom, the concisely named Doom Loot Box Mod removes weapons and powerups from every map and instead replaces them with crates. Every enemy has a random chance at dropping a key to unlock said chests, although drop rates are satirically low.

“There’s such a sharp contrast between the games industry in 1993 when Doom came out and the games industry now, which I think makes Doom a great platform for this kind of satire”

The new in-game marketplace lists prices for different amounts of keys and crates to purchase in order to speed up your in-game progression, but with a twist: the servers are offline. Attempting to purchase any microtransactions in Doom Loot Box Mod results with a message that’ll make your wallet sigh with relief: “Error. Could not connect to the Doom servers. Please try again later.”

Doom is one of my favourite games,” the modder told us. “There’s such a sharp contrast between the games industry in 1993 when Doom came out and the games industry now, which I think makes Doom a great platform for this kind of satire”

Following the horrendous abuse of microtransactions in DICE’s Star Wars Battlefront 2, Rip and Tear’s modification of this beloved classic is one of the better hot takes targeted towards the increases of additional purchases in modern video games to date.

This isn’t the first time that the original Doom has been used as an example of the escalation of modern first person shooters. The popular 2011 YouTube series If Doom Was Done Today took the original game and scripted it around a satirical representation of the modern military shooter, complete with navigation markers, ADS (Aim Down Sights) and the ever-infuriating, “you are hurt, get to cover” prompt.

To download the Doom Loot Box Mod, click here to view the original post.

About Lewis White

Hailing from the sheep-filled lands of South Wales, Lewis is a very hard to please gamer. While he goes out of his way to purposefully critique the most broken games he can find, he finds a peaceful salvation in games that are actually well crafted.

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